Looney Tunes Movie Collection (Bugs Bunny-Road Runner Movie 1001 Rabbit Tales) photo 01

Looney Tunes Movie Collection (Bugs Bunny-Road Runner Movie 1001 Rabbit Tales) photo 01
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Looney Tunes Movie Collection (Bugs Bunny-Road Runner Movie 1001 Rabbit Tales) photo 01
Lights, camera, Looney-ness! The Spotlight is on 2 Looney Tunes movies – now remastered so that every image shines and every fine Acme product goes swoosh like new. The chase is on in Disc 1’s The Bugs Bunny/Road-Runner Movie as Elmer pursues the pesky wabbit, Daffy Duck tries to elude the animator’s eraser and Wile E. Coyote tears after Road Runner and Bugs. By the way, how do you catch a Road Runner? You don’t! Beep-Beep! More cartoon harelarity is what’s up, doc, in Disc 2’s Bugs Bunny’s 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit Tales. Our long-eared hero becomes a spinner of fantastical stories while held captive in a desert sultan’s palace. Yosemite Sam is the sawed-off sidewinder wielding the sultan’s sword. Mad mallard Daffy joins the fun, coping (or not) with a meanie-genie. The rest, as they say, is…hysterical!The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie
Chuck Jones directed some of the funniest shorts in the history of filmmaking, and this 1979 feature-length compilation includes several of his best cartoons. Among the 11 shorts shown in their entirety are the classics “Robin Hood Daffy,” “What’s Opera, Doc?,” “Bully for Bugs,” and “Duck Amuck,” which remain as hilarious as they were when first released 50 years ago. As with any collection, the viewer wonders why some films were omitted or cut (“Long Haired Hare” combs footage from several Road Runner shorts into a 20-minute montage weakening the pacing). These caveats aside, The Bugs Bunny Road Runner Movie provides a showcase not only for Jones’s razor-sharp timing, but for the work of his exceptional crew, which included designer Maurice Noble, writer Mike Maltese, composers Carl Stalling and Milt Franklyn, and voice actor Mel Blanc. –Charles Solomon
1001 Rabbit Tales
If Bugs Bunny were to direct his signature inquiry–“What’s up, doc?”–toward the modern-day Warner Bros. creative team, he wouldn’t be far off. For 1001 Rabbit Tales, they’ve doctored up a batch of classic cartoons featuring the carrot muncher and his bumbling comrades and bundled them, near seamlessly, into a feature-length film. Here’s the premise: Bugs and Daffy, both book salesmen, are competing to sell the most copies of a kids’ book. Instead of burrowing a beeline to his sales territory (he should have made a left at Albuquerque), Bugs ends up in the castle of Yosemite Sam, here a harem-leading honcho. Sam’s pain-in-the-spurs son, Prince Abalaba, needs somebody to read him stories; Bugs, who’d sooner take the job than suffer the alternative, that involving being boiled in oil, signs on. Each rabbit-read narrative replaces a sedate story with a Loony Tunes favorite: In “Jack and the Beanstalk,” a canary-keeping giant bellows “Fee, fi, fo, fat, I tawt I taw a puddy tat”; the witch in “Hansel and Gretel” develops a hankering for rabbit stew; “Goldilocks” goes feline as Sylvester swaps his porridge for suffering succotash on behalf of his bratty son. In the end, the varmint finds a way to vamoose, but, being a generous sort of bunny, he doesn’t keep the address from his commission-hungry coworker. From there, the feathers fly, as does the rest of this feature, which is undiluted fun for fans of these cartoons from way back as well as those just getting to know the loopy Looney Tunes gang. (Ages 4 and older) –Tammy La Gorce


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